Hearing the Last 10%

Top 3 worst feelings in life….1. Throwing up 2. A Severe Sunburn 3. Being Corrected. Since this insn’t a WebMD blog I’m going to address the third one. A few days ago I talked about the importance of saying the last 10% in our relationships (saying the things that are the most difficult).

Tonight, I want to talk about the other side of that…..hearing the last 10%. I was meeting with some friends tonight and they shared their last 10% with me. It wasn’t easy for them to say and I can tell you that it wasn’t easy for me to hear. As they shared I wanted in so many ways to be able to tell them that they didn’t understand or they were way off base, but the truth is they were right on. In that moment I had a decision to make: get defensive and angry or listen and process. Thankfully, the Lord helped me to listen and own my junk.

Bottom Line: God will use friendships and even people we can’t stand to communicate truth. We must be mature enough to listen, process what was shared for truth and apply it.

 

Please note: I reserve the right to delete comments that are offensive or off-topic.

4 thoughts on “Hearing the Last 10%

  1. Thanks for revealing your ideas with this blog. As well, a fantasy regarding the banking institutions intentions if talking about property foreclosures is that the bank will not take my repayments. There is a fair bit of time the bank will need payments here and there. If you are too deep within the hole, they’re going to commonly require that you pay the payment entirely. However, i am not saying that they will not take any sort of repayments at all. In the event you and the loan company can seem to work anything out, the foreclosure practice may cease. However, when you continue to miss out on payments underneath the new program, the foreclosure process can just pick up where it left off.

  2. I have realized that over the course of creating a relationship with real estate entrepreneurs, you’ll be able to come to understand that, in every real estate purchase, a commission amount is paid. In the long run, FSBO sellers never “save” the commission payment. Rather, they try to win the commission by simply doing a strong agent’s task. In completing this task, they commit their money along with time to carry out, as best they can, the obligations of an agent. Those obligations include displaying the home through marketing, introducing the home to buyers, creating a sense of buyer emergency in order to make prompt an offer, making arrangement for home inspections, handling qualification inspections with the financial institution, supervising maintenance tasks, and aiding the closing.

  3. I have realized that over the course of building a relationship with real estate managers, you’ll be able to come to understand that, in every real estate transaction, a commission is paid. All things considered, FSBO sellers really don’t “save” the commission. Rather, they struggle to earn the commission by simply doing the agent’s task. In completing this task, they spend their money in addition to time to perform, as best they could, the obligations of an broker. Those responsibilities include getting known the home through marketing, offering the home to buyers, creating a sense of buyer urgency in order to make prompt an offer, preparing home inspections, dealing with qualification assessments with the mortgage lender, supervising maintenance tasks, and facilitating the closing.

  4. I have realized that over the course of creating a relationship with real estate entrepreneurs, you’ll be able to get them to understand that, in every single real estate transaction, a percentage is paid. Ultimately, FSBO sellers never “save” the percentage. Rather, they fight to earn the commission by means of doing an agent’s task. In this, they spend their money along with time to accomplish, as best they’re able to, the responsibilities of an real estate agent. Those tasks include getting known the home via marketing, presenting the home to all buyers, creating a sense of buyer urgency in order to induce an offer, arranging home inspections, dealing with qualification investigations with the lender, supervising maintenance tasks, and aiding the closing of the deal.

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